Details

January 29, 2015

$350

Course runs from 8:00am–12:00pm.

Registration fee includes course materials, campus parking and catered breakfast.

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“In business, you don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.”

—Chester L. Karrass, author and Howard Hughes Doctoral Fellowship Award recipient

About the Program

We are in negotiation almost constantly — in our careers and in daily life. The outcome depends greatly on our understanding of the negotiation and communication process.

As life becomes more complex and the world more diverse, your ability to use negotiation skills becomes more important. Negotiation requires time and patience. By using the negotiation strategies and skills suggested in this course, you can make conflict resolution a regular part of your approach to managing relationships at home, at work and in the community. Negotiation can serve not only to preserve relationships, but to continually strengthen and improve them.

Negotiation is most successful when both sides:

  • Recognize the value of a relationship and have a mutual desire to continue it.
  • Participate actively in the process.
  • Show consideration and acceptance of each other's perspectives, values, beliefs and goals.
  • Separate personality from the issue involved.
  • Work together to develop a solution everyone can accept.

Focus

The objectives of this course are to develop negotiation skills experientially and to learn useful analytical frameworks for understanding negotiations. Emphasis is placed on realistic negotiation exercises and role playing. The exercises serve as catalysts for the evaluation and discussion of different types of negotiation situations.

Impact

  • Know when to cooperate and when to compete in negotiations
  • Realize better outcomes and close stronger deals
  • Utilize essential analytical elements to focus your efforts and prepare successfully
  • Gain a new sense of confidence when negotiating

Participants

This course is appropriate for executives and company representatives at any corporate level who desire a sharper edge in the art of negotiating. This course teaches the theory and basics of negotiation and is not intended for highly experienced negotiators of complex agreements.

Instructor

Dr. David Schkade is associate dean and holds the Jerome Katzin Chair at the Rady School of Management. He previously served on the faculties of the University of Texas at Austin, Princeton University, Duke University and the University of Chicago. He received a B.A. in mathematics and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin and an M.S. and Ph.D. in organizational psychology from Carnegie Mellon University.

His work includes two books and over 50 papers, with a primary focus on how people form and express their preferences and how their decision making can be improved. He teaches the psychology of decision making, negotiation, decision analysis, organizational behavior and research methods.

Dr. Schkade won both the top research (1999) and MBA teaching (2003) awards from the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas and was selected to Who's Who in Economics 1990-2000. His research on punitive damages has been cited in numerous court cases, including opinions by the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals and the California State Supreme Court.

His editorials, quotations and references to his work have appeared in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Financial Times, L.A. Times, Time Magazine, CNN, UPI, Reuters, ABC, CBS, NPR and BBC.

Testimonials

“The negotiation exercise was extremely helpful. It forced you to think about both sides’ needs as well as how it applied to real world negotiations.”

“Professor Schkade is a dynamic presenter with great examples.”

“I can apply this to many areas of life.”