Ayelet Gneezy

Curriculum Vitae

cv-ayelet-gneezy.pdf

Contact Information

Rady School of Management
Wells Fargo Hall, Room 3W119
9500 Gilman Drive #0553
La Jolla, CA 92093-0553
Phone: 858.534.4131­
Fax: 858.534.0745­
Email: agneezy@ucsd.edu

Industry Areas

Consumer goods
Services
Non-profit

Ayelet Gneezy

Associate Professor of Behavioral Sciences and Marketing

Gneezy’s research addresses a wide variety of questions pertaining to consumer behavior such as behavioral pricing, prosocial behavior (with a focus on green/sustainable behavior), social preferences (e.g., promise accounting, negative reciprocity, fairness), and factors affecting individuals’ quality of life (e.g. nutrition & exercise, poverty). In her research, Gneezy collaborates with small (a Temecula base winery) and large (e.g. Disney) firms and integrates field experiments to test her predictions in “the wild”. Recently, professor Gneezy started collaborating with organizations and researchers interested in questions that address the many challenges facing our society such as poverty, hunger, and health.

Her research has been published in a number of leading academic journals, including Science, PNAS, the Journal of Marketing Research, and the Journal of Consumer Research, and has been covered in media outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Scientific American, and the Atlantic.

Gneezy received her Ph.D. in Marketing from the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, immediately after which she joined the Rady School of Management at UCSD. Prior to obtaining her Ph.D., Gneezy earned an MBA in the Netherlands, and then returned to Israel to manage the strategic planning department in DataPro Proximity (a subsidiary of BBDO Worldwide).

Papers

Baca-Motes, K., Brown, A., Gneezy, A. Keenan, E. and Nelson, L. D. (2013). Commitment and Behavior Change: Evidence from the Field. Journal of Consumer Research, 39, 1070-1084.

Gneezy, A., Gneezy, U., Riener, G., & Nelson, L. D. (2012). Pay-What-You-Want, Identity, and Self-Signaling, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(19): 7236–7240.

Gneezy, A., Imas, A., Nelson, L. D., Brown, A., and Norton, M. I. (2012). Paying to be Nice: Costly Prosocial Behavior and Consistency, Management Science, 58:179-187. * Special issue on Behavioral Economics.
Online Appendix

Gneezy, A. and Fessler D.T. (2011). Conflict, sticks and carrots: war increases prosocial punishments and rewards . Proceedings of the Royal Society B., published online before print June 8, 2011, doi:10.1098/rspb.2011.0805

Gneezy, A., Gneezy, U., Nelson, L. D. and Brown, A. (2010). Shared Social Responsibility: A Field Experiment in Pay-What-You-Want Pricing and Charitable Giving. Science, 329 (5989), 325-327.
Winner of the 2012 Society for Personality and Social Psychology Robert B. Cialdini Award for excellence in a published field study.

Shu, S. and Gneezy, A. (2010). Procrastination of Enjoyable Experiences, Journal of Marketing Research. 47(5), 933-944.

Epley, N., & Gneezy, A. (2007). The Framing of Financial Windfalls and Implications for Public Policy. Journal of Socio-Economics, 36, 36-47.

Gneezy, A., & Epley, N. (2007). Prospect Theory. In R. Baumeister, & K. D. Vohs (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Social Psychology (Vol. 2, 711-714). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.


Media Coverage

Working Harder Not Really Worth It, Researchers Find (06/02/14)
TIME

Obesity? We’re used to it (05/18/14)
Boston Globe

Why You Really Don't Need to Go Above and Beyond (05/18/14)
The Muse

The Case for Free Admission (02/07/14)
The New Yorker

The pay-offs and perils of pay-as-you-wish (01/21/14)
BBC

How can we outwit our lazier selves? (01/03/14)
Financial Times

CardHub’s 8 Gift Card Tips for 2013 (11/25/13)
CardHub.com

Pay-what-you-want pricing: playing tag with price tags (08/16/13)
An article published by Financial Times referencing Gneezy's photograph experiment.

Panera's pay-as-you-go pricing experiment failed. Here's how they could fix it. (07/14/13)
An article from the Washington Post referencing Gneezy's studies on customer's behavior with sliding scale options.

'Pay What You Want' Study Suggests Pride Keeps People From Being Cheap (04/23/12)
Details Gneezy's study on how consumers behave when given a sliding scale of options.

Professor: Naming Own Price Can Be a Success

Rady Study Examines How to Best Persuade Consumers to Help Protect the Planet

Five More Minutes (in Hebrew)

The New York Times: How to Maximize Pay-What-You-Wish Pricing
An entry in the blog Freakonomics on Gneezy's article published in the journal Science.

Scientific American: "Name-your-price" approach boosts charitable donations and corporate profits
Explores Gneezy's article on shared social responsibility that offers a name-your-own-price model.

Discover: Caring with cash or how Radiohead could have made more money
A blog posting on Gneezy's article in Science on shared social responsibility

Science podcast
An audio report on Gneezy's study of people's response to a name-your-own-price policy, starting at minute 16.

Boston Globe: The Best Vacation Ever
Discusses Gneezy's research that concludes that people take longer to redeem gift certificates if they are given more time

New York Times: Carpe Diem? Maybe Tomorrow
Details Gneezy's studies on postponing positive experiences

The End of Rational Ecomonics
Article explains how and when customers seek revenge and cheat big businesses.

The Marker: Who Benefits From "Name-Your-Own-Price" Pricing Scheme? (in Hebrew)

The Atlantic: The Gift-Card Economy
Explains in depth Gneezy's research on postponing positive experiences

The New Yorker: A Smarter Stimulus
Details Gneezy's study on how people spend tax refund money

Marketing in the Digital Age
A video of an interview with Gneezy discussing her marketing research

New York Times: When Virtue Begets Vice
Details Gneezy's studies on moral consistency


Working Papers

Poor and impatient: Helplessness driven poverty (with A. Imas).

Spillover of placebo effects (with U. Gneezy, and E. Yoeli).

To tip or not to tip: emotional and monetary tradeoffs in tipping (with N. Mazar).

Mission impossible: Ironic choice overload (with E. Williams and D. Armor).

Being thin is being healthy? The representativeness heuristic in health risk assessments (w. J. Outlaw and J. Schwartz)

Fooled by the deal: A mental-accounting explanation of slippage in mail-in rebates (with S. Saccardo and J. Vosgerau).

Testing the role of price information: Motivating or informative? (with H. Plassmann and B. Shiv).

Through a prosocial lens: Ought and want motivations in environmental behavior (with E. Keenan and C. Zhong).

More than meets the eyes: Consumer response to promotional offers (with M. Campbell)

Tipping and reciprocity (with U. Gneezy).


Additional Works

Intuition Can’t Be Beat (Rady Business Journal — Summer 2011)